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City of Seattle Combined Legislative Records Search

Information retrieved on October 13, 2019 1:23 PM


Resolution Number: 31439


Title
A RESOLUTION adopting Statements of Legislative Intent (SLIs) for the 2013 Adopted Budget, the 2013 Endorsed Budget and 2013-2018 Adopted Capital Improvement Program (CIP).


Status: Adopted
Date adopted by Full Council: March 25, 2013
Vote: 9-0
Date of Mayor's signature:
(About the signature date)

Date introduced/referred to committee: March 18, 2013
Committee: Full Council
Sponsor: BURGESS
Committee Recommendation:
Date of Committee Recommendation:
Committee Vote:

Index Terms: CITY-COUNCIL, BUDGET, STATING-POLICY

Fiscal Note: Fiscal Note to Resolution 31439

Electronic Copy: PDF scan of Resolution No. 31439


Text

A RESOLUTION adopting Statements of Legislative Intent (SLIs) for the 2013 Adopted Budget, the 2013 Endorsed Budget and 2013-2018 Adopted Capital Improvement Program (CIP).

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Seattle has reviewed the 2013-2014 Proposed Budget and 2013-2018 Proposed CIP; and

WHEREAS, the City Council adopted a budget and a capital improvement program for 2013, through Ordinance No. 117647, and endorsed a budget for 2014, though Resolution No. 31415, on November 19, 2012; and

WHEREAS, in order to indicate the intent of the City Council in adopting the 2013 Budget and the 2013-2018 CIP, and endorsing the 2014 Budget, the Council developed the attached SLIs; and

WHEREAS, the City Council adopted and filed Clerk File No. 312591, which contains preliminary versions of SLIs for the 2013 Adopted Budget, the 2014 Endorsed Budget and the 2013-2018 Adopted CIP; and

WHEREAS, Clerk File No. 312591 states that in the case of a conflict between the version of a SLI in the Clerk File and the one adopted in this Resolution, the latter controls;

NOW, THEREFORE,

BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SEATTLE, THAT:

Section 1. The Council adopts the Statements of Legislative Intent for the 2013 Adopted Budget, the 2014 Endorsed Budget and the 2013-2018 Adopted Capital Improvement Program, contained in Attachment #A (2013 Statements of Legislative Intent by Council Committee) to this resolution.

Adopted by the City Council the ____ day of ____________________, 2013, and signed by me in open session in authentication of its adoption this________ day

of ______________________, 2013.

_________________________________

President ___________of the City Council

Filed by me this ____ day of ________________________, 2013.

____________________________________

City Clerk

(Seal)

Ben Noble/ss LEG 2013 SLI Resolution February 1, 2013 Version #1

ATTACHMENT:

A. 2013 Statements of Legislative Intent by Council Committee.

2013 STATEMENTS OF LEGISLATIVE INTENT (SLI) BY COUNCIL COMMITTEE

ATTACHMENT A

2013 Statements of Legislative Intent (SLI) by Council Committee Attachment A

Section I: Summary of SLIs


No.

SLI No.

TITLE

DATE DUE
TO COUNCIL

Economic Resiliency and Regional Relations

1.

120-1-A-1

Request for additional information on the Career Bridge program.

February 1, 2013 and
July 1, 2013

2.

121-1-A-1

Report on the outcomes of OED's entrepreneurial training and microlending programs.

July 1, 2013

Energy and Environment

3.

36-1-A-1

Community Power Works Assessment and Plan for Further Action.

July 31, 2013

Government Performance and Finance / Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology

4.

24-1-A-1

Requesting that DoIT report quarterly and at major decision points to the Council on its progress in developing a strategy for the Next Generation Data Center Initiative.

March 31, 2013
June 30, 2013
September 30, 2013 & at major decision

Housing, Human Services, Health & Culture

5.

3-1-A-2

Long-term options for Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center

September 1, 2013

6.

48-1-A-1

DPD Rental Housing Registration and Inspection Program implementation.

March 31, 2013

7.

88-1-A-1

Requesting the Human Services Department (HSD) to update Council on implementation of its strategic plan and to conduct a review of outcomebased contracts.

March 30, 2013 and August 31, 2013

8.

90-2-A-1

Council review of service needs to be addressed in a 2013 RFI for the Outdoor Meal Site and all other food programs funded by the HSD Transitional Living and Support Division.

May 31, 2013

9.

95-3-A-1

Report on Violence Prevention and Diversion Programs for Young Adults.

July 31, 2013

10.

102-1-A-1

Homeless Youth and Young Adults.

September 3, 2013

11.

104-1-A-1

Reports on Prioritization Policy and Barriers to Housing for Homeless Families.

January 30, 2013 &
July 1, 2013

12.

104-2-A-1

Services for Out of City Homeless.

July 1, 2013

13.

125-2-A-1

SLI for Friends of Little Saigon Study.

March 1, 2013

14.

146-2-A-1

Home Repair Program Funding.

June 3, 2013

Libraries, Utilities, and Center

15.

27-1-A-1

SPU Rate Growth Strategic Plan.

June 30, 2014

16.

33-1-A-1

SPU and SCL Bill Delinquency Reduction.

March 31, 2013

Parks and Neighborhoods

17.

41-3-A-1

Comprehensive Report Regarding Recreational and Parks Program Service Needs of the Lake City Urban Village and North District Neighborhood Planning Area.

September 30, 2013

18.

107-2-A-1

Community Center Attendance and Usage Analysis by DPR.

June 1, 2013
(Progress Report)
September 9, 2013

19.

111-1-A-1

DPR and ARC Fundraising.

First Report -
May 1, 2013
Progress Reports -
June 30,
September 30 and
December 31, 2013

20.

114-1-A-1

Athletic Fields fees for 2014 and 2015.

May 1, 2013

Planning, Land Use and Sustainability

21.

49-1-A-1

DPD Planning Division work program development and reporting.

March 31, 2013
June 30, 2013
September 30, 2013
December 31, 2013

Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology

22.

60-2-B-2

SOCR Review of Civil Rights Enforcement Process.

June 30, 2013

23.

62-1-A-1

Police: Determining the appropriate size of the police force.

March 29, 2013


Transportation Committee

24.

76-3-A-1

Transit Master Plan Implementation.

March 31, 2013

25.

77-2-A-1

Accelerating neighborhood greenways, the Downtown cycle track network, & West Seattle lower bridge trail access.

First report -
March 29, 2013
Second report -
September 27, 2013



2013 STATEMENTS OF LEGISLATIVE INTENT (SLI) BY COUNCIL COMMITTEE

SECTION II: SLIS

Economic Resiliency and Regional Relations



1. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

120

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Request for additional information on the Career Bridge program

Councilmembers:

Burgess; Clark; Conlin

Staff Analyst:

Sara Belz



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/09/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Office of Economic Development (OED) and the Human Services Department (HSD) are requested to provide the Council with additional information about the Career Bridge program before the delivery of the 2014 Proposed Budget. The content of OED's response to this Statement of Legislative Intent will help inform the Council's decision about whether to provide ongoing funding to the Career Bridge program.

By February 1, 2013, OED and HSD are requested to deliver the following to the Council's Committee on Economic Resiliency and Regional Relations (CERRR):

* A detailed description of the Career Bridge program, including its proposed organizational design and service delivery models.

* Information about how the framework for Career Bridge was shaped by existing research and established best practices related to the provision of workforce development services for extremely disadvantaged individuals. If the program's design is informed primarily by innovation, a description of any influential theories or local experiences should be provided.

* Expected timelines for any competitive processes that would be initiated in 2013 or 2014 to select contractual program partners. A list of any existing program partners and information about how they were selected should also be provided.

By July 1, 2013, OED and HSD, in coordination with the Office of the City Auditor (Auditor), are requested to deliver the following to CERRR:

* A detailed annual reporting plan that identifies specific, measurable, target program outcomes, such as the numbers of individuals expected to annually enroll in Career Bridge, complete education and job readiness training, and be placed in a post-secondary instructional program or stable employment. Outcomes related to the jobs obtained by program participants (e.g. position type, wages, benefits, length of time in job) should also be identified. In addition, the reporting plan should include information about how target program outcomes were identified and, if applicable, how they compare to the outcomes associated with employment and training programs serving similar populations in other jurisdictions.

* A preliminary report on Career Bridge outcomes using data collected from the first three cohorts of program participants.

* Estimates of Career Bridge's fixed and scalable costs and information about how potential changes to the City's annual CDBG allocations could impact the program's scope and capacity.

A companion green sheet (120-2-A-1) would add $50,000 in General Subfund (GSF) support to the Auditor's Performance Evaluation Program in 2013 and 2014 for a comprehensive evaluation of Career Bridge's effectiveness in moving participants into employment training or steady jobs. Consistent with that green sheet, the independent consultant selected by the Auditor to complete the evaluation would also be tasked with assisting OED and HSD with the work described above that would be due to CERRR by July 1, 2013.

Background:

Career Bridge would provide extremely disadvantaged individuals facing multiple barriers to employment with access to mentoring support, education and job readiness training, and the wraparound social services they need (e.g., housing, childcare, transportation) to succeed as students and in the workforce. The population groups that Career Bridge would seek to assist include low-income men of color, the previously incarcerated, and limited English speakers. Career Bridge is intended to serve as a precursor and supplement to the employment training and placement services the Seattle Jobs Initiative (SJI) supports for jobless and underemployed adults. Together with OED and HSD, SJI would be a critical partner in developing and implementing Career Bridge over the next two years.

The Proposed Budget provides $210,000 for Career Bridge in 2013 and $800,000 in 2014. The 2013 funding includes $150,000 GSF from OED's 2013 contract with SJI and $60,000 in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds that would be allocated through HSD. In 2014, a total of $800,000 in HSD CDBG funding is proposed.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Economic Resiliency and Regional Relations

Date Due to Council: February 1, 2013 and July 1, 2013

2. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

121

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Report on the outcomes of OED's entrepreneurial training and micro-lending programs

Councilmembers:

Clark; Conlin; Rasmussen

Staff Analyst:

Sara Belz



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that by July 1, 2013, the Office of Economic Development (OED) prepare a report on its entrepreneurial training and micro-lending activities. Since 2010, OED has, through its growSeattle initiative, provided entrepreneurial and business development training to immigrant business owners. Past City investments in this work include $150,000 in 2010 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds and $75,000 in 2012 CDBG support. The 2013-2014 Proposed Budget includes $75,000 per year in continued funding for immigrant entrepreneurial training services. To date, OED estimates 186 business owners have received training through this initiative, including 70 that launched new businesses after participating in the program. Washington CASH is currently under contract with OED to administer the training sessions.

In 2014, the Proposed Budget also includes $375,000 to support a companion micro-lending initiative. Through the lending initiative, an estimated seven to ten loans with an average size of about $50,000 would be provided to low-income small business owners, leading to the projected creation or retention of about ten jobs. It is expected that most, if not all, of the loan funds would be used to support lending activities that would be considered unbankable by conventional lenders.

Between 2009 and 2012, OED managed a similar lending initiative using $1.4 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) CDBG funds. OED partnered with Community Capital Development, Craft3, and the Rainier Valley Community Development Fund to deploy those resources, which were ultimately used to issue 22 loans with an average size of about $60,000. An estimated 46 jobs were created or retained as a result of that effort.

Before the Council agrees to commit 2014 CDBG funds to entrepreneurial training and micro-lending activities through OED's growSeattle initiative, OED is requested to deliver a report to the Council's Committee on Economic Resiliency and Regional Relations that includes the following components:

* Data on the outcomes of OED's investments in entrepreneurial training for immigrant business owners through the end of 2012. At minimum, the provided information should include the number of existing and prospective business owners that received training in each program year, the number of new businesses opened each year by training participants, and the number of affected businesses that are still operating.

* A status report on the repayment and redeployment of the distributed ARRA loan funds.

* A workplan for deploying the proposed 2014 CDBG loan funds.

* A detailed plan for tracking, evaluating, and annually reporting on outcomes associated with both the entrepreneurial training and micro-lending components of the growSeattle program. The plan should identify measurable, target outcomes for both initiatives that would be tracked over time by OED staff.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Economic Resiliency and Regional Relations

Date Due to Council: July 1, 2013

Energy and Environment



3. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

36

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Community Power Works Assessment and Plan for Further Action

Councilmembers:

Burgess; Clark; O'Brien

Staff Analyst:

Meg Moorehead



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Office of Sustainability and Environment (OSE) in coordination with Seattle City Light (SCL) submit a report on the Community Power Works (CPW) program that:

1. Assessment

A. With the assistance of Washington State University's Energy Program, evaluates each element of the CPW program to identify program progress and results relative to original goals and grant contract deliverables.

B. Compares CPW results to similar programs conducted by businesses, City departments and similar jurisdictions, in terms of results achieved for the cost within specified timeframes.

C. Identifies lessons learned from CPW including the program elements and implementation approaches that were most and least successful, which elements are best implemented by the private and non-profit sectors, and other factors.

D. Summarizes SCL's opportunities and challenges in supporting single-family residential energy conservation (including available information on the relative efficiency of single-family homes) and Puget Sound Energy's current and likely future support for single-family natural gas conservation.

2. Plan for Further Action

A. Based on the assessment of CPW results, revisit CPW goals and identify appropriate new goals for any efforts to continue or evolve from CPW.

B. Identify possible future program elements that are justified based on the CPW assessment and updated goals. Identify each element's target audience, the most appropriate private or public entities for implementation, performance metrics for measuring success, and program design.

C. For program elements most appropriately implemented by the City of Seattle, identify the lead department, program goals and performance metrics, staffing and resource needs, work program with a schedule for results, and a sustainable funding source.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Energy and Environment

Date Due to Council: July 31, 2013

Government Performance and Finance / Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology



4. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

24

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Requesting that DoIT report quarterly and at major decision points to the Council on its progress in developing a strategy for the Next Generation Data Center Initiative

Councilmembers:

Burgess; Clark; Harrell

Staff Analyst:

Tony Kilduff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 72-Absent

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Department of Information Technology (DoIT) provide written progress reports to all Councilmembers on the status of the Next Generation Data Center Initiative, and where appropriate, oral briefings to Public Safety, Civil Rights &Technology and the Government Performance and Finance committees. The reports should focus on timelines, milestone, critical issues and key decisions within the project. The reports should be provided quarterly and at critical decision points.

Background:

In 2012, the City identified a power transmission problem that directly impacted the City's primary data center managed by DoIT and therefore affected the business operations of all City departments. In addition, separate IT infrastructure housed in the same building but managed by City Light and the Department of Transportation was also affected. The problem was repaired but underscored the need to upgrade the City's systems. Within the same timeframe, an engineering report commissioned by the City concluded that none of the existing City data centers meet the City's current business needs. Most of the City s data centers were developed to meet the technology requirements of more than a decade ago. Since then, technology and business needs have changed significantly and the existing data centers cannot meet current or future City requirements.

The 2013 budget includes funding to begin a multi-year effort to invest in an upgraded system of integrated data centers. The project is expected to take three years to complete. During 2013, DoIT will work with FAS and other City departments to collect and define the requirements for the new environment. Those requirements will then be analyzed and used to develop options for the future data center environment. Options to be considered include retrofitting existing centers, leasing new data center space from a private or another governmental entity, moving some applications into the cloud, building a new City owned facility, or some combination of the above.

Once the options have been assessed and a solution selected (in the latter part of 2013), work will begin to develop the detailed plans necessary to implement that solution. This will include any necessary facility/space acquisition, build-outs, upgrades, migration/move plans, etc. DoIT anticipates that funding in the 2014-15 budgets will cover the costs of the actual acquisitions, build-outs, upgrades, moves, etc.

The funding included for 2013 assumes a combination of City and external staffing resources will be used for this effort. Two new positions will be created: one as the City's project manager for this effort, and the second to lead the effort to develop a Citywide perspective, plan and processes for the business continuity of the City's technology systems.

The City houses over 700 separate applications and systems in its data centers. Ownership, use, and operation of those systems is distributed across City departments; however, for them to be housed in a shared environment supported by shared infrastructure (electrical, cooling, etc.) and shared services (virtual environments, storage, web hosting, etc.) requires development and maintenance of a coordinated structure.

2013 funding will also be used to acquire appropriate external resources and expertise to complete the planning and execution of this effort. This could include such resources as specialized engineering expertise (data center design is a specialized skill set), resources to assist in detailed requirements gathering and analysis, resources to supplement existing City IT staff resources. Later, if the City chooses to build its own facility, architectural, construction, and other skills will be required.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Government Performance and Finance; Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology

Date Due to Council: March 31, 2013, June 31, 2013, September 31, 2013 & at major decision points

Housing, Human Services, Health & Culture



5. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

3

1

A

2



Budget Action Title:

Long-term options for Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center

Councilmembers:

Burgess; Licata; O'Brien

Staff Analyst:

Michael Jenkins



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 72-Absent

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs (OACA), working with the Seattle Arts Commission (SAC) present its final recommendations, and a plan to implement those recommendations, concerning long-term operations of Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center (LHPAC). The plan should focus on maintaining LHPAC's existing programming for the African American community while 1) enhancing other types of programming and events at LHPAC and 2) establishing a mechanism for long-term financial support and stability for LHPAC.

In developing this plan, OACA should consider, and then recommend, whether LHPAC should:

1) continue to be operated by the City;

2) be leased or transferred to a group or organization to carry forward LHPAC programming; or

3) be managed by a third-party organization for the City

The plan should also include a financial review of why OACA's preferred option provides the best opportunity for long-term fiscal stability for LHPAC.

Finally, Council requests that OACA, in concert with SAC, create a stakeholder group in developing this plan, comprised of LHPAC's audiences, its patrons, and the arts and culture community.

The plan should be provided to the Council in two parts -an interim report by September 1, 2013 with the final plan presented by June 1, 2014. The 2015-2016 Proposed Budget should assume implementation of the preferred option.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: September 1, 2013

6. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

48

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

DPD Rental Housing Registration and Inspection Program implementation

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Clark; Licata

Staff Analyst:

Ketil Freeman



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Department of Planning and Development (DPD) report to the Council by March 31, 2013 with an implementation plan for the Rental Housing Registration and Inspection Program codified in Seattle Municipal Code Section 22.214.010 et seq. The implementation plan should, at a minimum, estimate resources needed by quarter over the biennium to undertake the following implementation steps:

* Establishing a publicly accessible database of properties regulated under the program;

* Outreach to regulated property owners;

* Registration of property owners;

* Outreach to tenants;

* Establishing a training program for private inspectors;

* Promulgating a rule for random inspections; and

* Commencement of random inspections.

The report should also include a proposed fee structures and distinguish implementation costs that will be reimbursed through fee revenue from costs that will be reimbursed through other revenue sources.

Background:

In 2012 the Council passed Ordinance 124011 and Ordinance 123311, which together created a regulatory program to register and inspect rental housing. The Rental Housing Registration and Inspection Program requires registration of rental housing beginning on January 1, 2014. Under the program rental units would be subject to inspection to ensure that the units meet minimum Housing Code requirements. Inspections would be performed by inspectors who have completed a training program administered by DPD.

The proposed budget does not appropriate funds for program startup activities nor does the proposed fee ordinance propose a fee structure to recover the cost of program administration. Startup activities could include, but are not limited to, creating a database of properties subject to the program, developing a training program for inspectors, and conducting outreach to property owners who may be regulated under the program.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: March 31, 2013

7. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

88

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Requesting the Human Services Department (HSD) to update Council on implementation of its strategic plan and to conduct a review of outcome-based contracts.

Councilmembers:

Burgess; Clark; Licata

Staff Analyst:

Michael Fong



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

In 2013, the Human Services Department (HSD) plans to continue implementing elements of the department's new strategic plan. HSD internal policy decisions are likely to impact the development of future Requests for Investments (RFIs), agency contracting, contract monitoring, service outcomes and delivery and have ongoing staffing and budget implications. Council is interested in monitoring HSD's progress in 2013 through this Statement of Legislative Intent (SLI). In addition, Council requests HSD to conduct a comprehensive review and analysis of its approach to outcome based contracting. The department is requested to provide the following:

1. Two written summaries on progress toward implementing the HSD strategic plan to the Housing, Human Services, Health and Culture (HHSHC) Committee. The first summary is due no later than March 30, 2013. The second summary is due no later than August 31, 2013. The HHSHC committee may request formal public briefings for each of these reports.

2. One written report on a comprehensive review of the department's use of outcomebased contracting with clearly articulated goals for using this tool and analysis of other models from around the country. This report is due no later than August 31, 2013. The HHSHC committee may request a formal public briefing on this report.

Below is additional information related to what the Council is seeking from the written reports requested in this SLI.

1. HSD Strategic Plan Implementation

The Council is particularly interested in HSD's progress on the following related to implementation of its new strategic plan:

* Progress related to developing new "outcome frameworks" and "logic models" for each division.

* Status of new investment plans for each division.

* Public outreach and stakeholder input associated with outcomes frameworks and investment plans. In particular, a specific plan should be outlined that clearly articulates HSD's engagement with agencies and service providers prior to the release of final products.

* Changes relating to RFI's and other procurement tools.

* Changes relating to contracts, including progress toward increasing the amount of detail and financial information required from service agencies.

* Changes underway to improve contract monitoring.

* Update on implementation of HSD job duties and expectations and staff performance evaluation tools.

* Summary of findings and progress to address staff capacity and data infrastructure needs for the department.

2. Outcomes-Based Contracts Review

In addition, Council is interested in HSD's approach to outcomes (performance) based contracting. The department primarily uses an 80% base pay/20% performance pay model to incentivize service agencies to meet certain outcome thresholds. In Central Staff's review of a small subset of HSD's outcomes based contracts, it appears that the 80% base pay portion is not consistently tied to outcomes, but rather to outputs. It is also unclear as to whether failure to meet performance outcomes leads to any consequence for service agencies, other than not receiving the 20% performance pay for that particular contract year. The department's ability to track, monitor and report on the relative effectiveness of the use of performance based contracts also appears lacking and insufficient.

There are many other models throughout the country for human services outcomes or performance based contracting (see "Approaches to Performance Based Contracting (PBC) For Social Services" by Lawrence L. Martin, MSW, MBA, PhD, University of Central Florida). HSD is requested to review its approach to outcomes-based contracting, identify any opportunities for improvement, evaluate other potential models and share with Council its findings and recommendations. HSD should develop clear goal(s) for having outcome based contracts and whether to continue the department's current approach, modify it or potentially implement new models for outcomes-based contracting to meet the articulated goals.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: March 30, 2013 and August 31, 2013

8. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

90

2

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Council review of service needs to be addressed in a 2013 RFI for the Outdoor Meal Site and all other food programs funded by the HSD Transitional Living and Support Division

Councilmembers:

Godden; Licata; Rasmussen

Staff Analyst:

Lisa Herbold; Meg Moorehead



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Human Services Department (HSD) Transitional Living and Support Division submit to the appropriate Council Committee an outline of the service needs and performance expectations that will be the basis of a 2013 Request for Investment (RFI) for the Outdoor Meal Site and other food programs. The Council intends that Committee will review the outline to ensure the Meal Program Transition Task Force's Outdoor Meal Site recommendations are implemented, leveraging of City funds with non-City resources is encouraged, and at least as many meals are provided under new contracts as were provided in 2012.

Background:

In February 2012 the City of Seattle Meal Program Transition Task Force consisting of Seattle HSD leadership, meal providers and community members was convened to determine the need for continued use of the City's Outdoor Meal Site, the feasibility of an indoor/outdoor centralized kitchen, alternatives to meal service in City parks and ways to expand meal services outside of Seattle's downtown corridor.

The Task Force recommended that the City-funded Outdoor Meal Site currently managed by Operation Sack Lunch at 6 th and Columbia remain intact until another site is identified and operational. The Outdoor Meal Site is projected to serve 159,000 meals in 2012. The City pays about $37,000 to provide approximately 8,400 of those meals, with the rest supplied at no cost to the City by about 40 providers.

The contracting process for continued operation of the Outdoor Meal Site and other HSD food programs will begin with a 2013 HSD RFI. Before the RFI is finalized, the Council wants to ensure that it implements the Task Force's Outdoor Meal Site recommendations, encourages leveraging of City funds with nonCity resources, and provides that at least as many meals are distributed through the Outdoor Meal Site and other HSD food programs under new contracts as were provided in 2012.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: March 31, 2013

9. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

95

3

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Report on Violence Prevention and Diversion Programs for Young Adults

Councilmembers:

Budget Committee

Staff Analyst:

Traci Ratzliff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/19/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests the Human Services Department provide a report concerning the violence prevention and diversion programs for young adults currently funded by the Department. The Executive is requested to provide the following:

A review of existing HSD-funded violence prevention and diversion programs for young adults, including description of specific program outcomes (such as placement in and retention of housing, completion of chemical dependency treatment, etc.) and whether individuals participating in such programs have successfully achieved these program outcomes from 2009 2013; and

Information regarding comparable programs, operated in other jurisdictions which have been formally evaluated and proven to be successful in achieving specific program outcomes related to diverting young adults from violence and/or initial or repeated involvement in the criminal justice system.

The Executive is requested to provide this report to the Housing, Human Services, Health and Culture Committee by March 29, 2013.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: March 29, 2013

10. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

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Version

102

1

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1



Budget Action Title:

Homeless Youth and Young Adults

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Clark; Licata

Staff Analyst:

Jesse Gilliam; Traci Ratzliff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

In 2012, the Seattle/King County Youth and Young Adult Task Force along with a group of private philanthropists developed and issued a plan entitled "Priority Action Steps to Prevent and End Youth/Young Adult Homelessness." Private foundations, including Ballmer Family Giving, Thomas V. Giddens Foundation, Medina Foundation, and Raikes Foundation, in addition to the United Way, have committed $3 million in new money over the next two years focused on prevention, rapid intervention and systems change. Programs being funded include:

* National Safe Place: a program creating 80-100 "Safe Places" youth can go if they run away or thrown out where they will be quickly connected to resources.

* Project Safe: a youth homeless prevention program where parents can call Youth Care for social work support before a young person runs away or is thrown out.

* Coordinated Entry and Engagement: King County has hired a staff person to work with homeless youth service providers to create a coordinated system of care between agencies.

* Data Sharing: A program to improve technology to enable agencies to share data to better track youth needs.

* Evaluation: An evaluation of Project Safe's effectiveness in preventing youth services. A SafePlace evaluation is already under way nationally.

The Council requests the foundations involved in funding the pilot programs, United Way, King County, and Youth Care provide a report by September 3, 2013 regarding:

* Evaluation to date regarding effectiveness of Safe Place and Project Safe in preventing youth homelessness

If data indicates Safe Place and/or Project Safe show effectiveness in preventing homelessness the Council could consider the possibility of providing funding for these programs as part of the 2014 budget process.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: September 3, 2013

11. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

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Version

104

1

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1



Budget Action Title:

Reports on Prioritization Policy and Barriers to Housing for Homeless Families

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Harrell; Licata

Staff Analyst:

Traci Ratzliff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

Council members are interested in reviewing the proposed policy for prioritizing placement of homeless families in permanent housing, and a report on barriers for families accessing housing. The Human Services Department is requested, in collaboration with King County Family Homelessness Initiative, FHC, and others to provide the following two reports to the Housing, Human Services, Health and Culture Committee:

1) The proposed prioritization policy for placement of homeless families into housing that will be implemented by the Family Housing Connections Program. This report is expected no later than January 30, 2013.

2) Information regarding the extent to which issues including, but not limited to, differing interpretations or definitions of homelessness, and strict eligibility criteria related to sobriety, are barriers to housing for homeless families. In addition, if barriers are identified, what recommended policy or program changes could be implemented to help families overcome identified barriers and access housing. This report is expected no later than July 1, 2013.

Background:

Family Housing Connections (FHC), the Countywide coordinated entry and assessment program, has a placement list of over 1,800 families Countywide who have been formally assessed and are in need of housing and other services. This number includes families who are homeless, those already residing in and those placed into emergency shelter, and families at risk of losing housing (within 30 days).

Currently, people are placed in housing from the FHC placement list based on eligibility for specific program services and the date they are referred by the Community Information Line (2-1-1) to FHC. A formal prioritization policy is not in place that guides which families on the placement list should be given housing first. The King County Family Homelessness Initiative consisting of partners involved in implementing the Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness that funds FHC is developing a prioritization policy for FHC that will be reviewed with agency partners prior to being vetted and approved by the Committee to End Homelessness Funders Group and Interagency Council, by early 2013. Council members are interested in reviewing this policy and aligning use of City funds for homeless families with this policy.

In addition, in a July 2012 report to the Housing, Human Services, Health and Culture Committee, staff from FHC indicated there were high denial rates for housing placement for families due to:

* Differing interpretations of homelessness definitions

* Strict eligibility criteria related to sobriety

Council members have indicated a desire to obtain further understanding of what issues pose barriers for families accessing housing and potential policy or program options that could be implemented to overcome such barriers.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: January 30, 2013 & July 1, 2013

12. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

104

2

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Services for Out of City Homeless

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Clark; Rasmussen

Staff Analyst:

Traci Ratzliff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

Like many major cities, it is anecdotally reported that Seattle attracts people searching for better employment opportunities or better quality support services than they can find in other parts of the state or country. Unfortunately, sometimes the better job opportunities don't materialize and support services in the city maintain waiting lists. This problem is particularly acute when it comes to homeless individuals and families. In September, the Human Services Department (HSD) reported that to date in 2012, 47% of the families served by the Emergency Services Program reported a most recent permanent address out of state. This is compared to 2011, when 37% of the families served were from out of state. In addition, 2011 Safe Harbors annual data showed that at least 14% of individuals accessing singleadult shelter, and at least 28% of individuals accessing transitional housing, gave a last permanent address outside of the city.

Some cities, such as New York City, have developed policies regarding the types of services that are provided to homeless individuals and families who are residents of New York City versus those who are not. The goal of this differentiation is not to deny survival services to anyone, rather to match people to services that will get them into stable housing as effectively as possible in or out of the NYC region.

The Council requests the Human Services Department obtain further information regarding policy and program options concerning the provision of services for homeless individuals and families who have come from outside the city. HSD shall collect information from other jurisdictions that have implemented policies or programs to serve out of city residents.

In addition, HSD is requested to provide additional data on where individuals and families in Seattle's shelter system are coming from, as provided by Family Housing Connection, Safe Harbors data system, and social service providers. This includes information on individuals and families coming from out of state, or cities or counties within Washington State. The Council requests HSD to provide this information to the Council by July 1, 2013, with potential recommended policy or program changes ready for implementation in 2014.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: July 1, 2013

13. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

125

2

A

1



Budget Action Title:

SLI for Friends of Little Saigon Study

Councilmembers:

Godden; Licata; O'Brien

Staff Analyst:

Esther Handy



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/09/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Background:

In September 2012, the Seattle City Council unanimously adopted Resolution 31403 stating the City of Seattle's intent to assist the Friends of Little Saigon and other community members in the Little Saigon Neighborhood to explore the feasibility of a mixeduse project that would serve as a positive catalyst to preserve and enhance Little Saigon as a social, cultural and economic hub.

This resolution was developed in the context of a several important City actions in and around Little Saigon, including land use amendments in 2011 that allow increased development in South Downtown, the installation of the First Hill Street Car and land use changes at Yesler Terrace. These changes will likely result in the redevelopment over time of portions of the Little Saigon neighborhood and may cause an increase in land values and rents that could displace existing businesses and community members. Developing a mixed use center is one strategy to help anchor the Vietnamese and other cultural communities in Little Saigon in the face of these changing market conditions.

Since adoption of the resolution in September, Friends of Little Saigon, with support of the Seattle Chinatown International District PDA, developed a draft scope of work for the feasibility study, including each of the potential project components: a cultural center, a night market, a SE Asian Market, a restaurant and housing.

Friends of Little Saigon and community partners are assembling funding for various aspects of this feasibility study and have requested city support for a portion of the project.

Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests the Office of Economic Development work with the Department of Planning and Development, the Office of Housing, Friends of Little Saigon, the Seattle Chinatown International District PDA and other community partners to develop a plan for the Little Saigon Study. This plan would include:

1) An outline of scope of the study;

2) Estimated costs for each portion of the study;

3) Responsible party for each portion and timeline for work;

4) Summary of neighborhood capacity building efforts to develop and steward the study;

5) Portion of the study that the City of Seattle would contract for services and the specific deliverables associated with that work;

6) How this study relates to other work the City is doing in Chinatown/International District.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: March 1, 2013

14. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

146

2

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Home Repair Program Funding

Councilmembers:

Budget Committee

Staff Analyst:

Traci Ratzliff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests the Office of Housing (OH) and the City Budget Office (CBO) to provide a report to the Housing, Human Services, Health and Culture Committee regarding the ongoing funding needed to continue to the City's Home Repair Program.

OH and CBO shall specifically analyze the Home Repair Program loan portfolio to determine remaining loans to be repaid and the likely annual repayment schedule over the next two to four years. Based on this analysis, OH and CBO shall determine if CDBG funded home repair loan repayments or a portion of these loan repayments need to be returned to the Home Repair Program to continue program operation, beginning in 2014 or later.

This information shall be provided to the Council by June 3, 2013 in time to inform the Mayor and Council's 2014 budget decisions.

Background:

The Home Repair Program provides low-interest loans to fund needed repairs to low income, mostly elderly single family homeowners. The program has been funded in recent years with prior Housing Levy funds, and CDBG funds. In January of 2007, loan repayments from CDBG funded home repair loans were redirected to other CDBG eligible activities due to a large fund balance that had accrued in the Home Repair Program. That fund balance is now nearly exhausted and the estimated loan repayments from other fund sources (approximately $170,000 a year) will maintain existing program production (approximately 35 loans a year) potentially only through late 2014. The total annual Home Repair Program budget (loan funding + administration) is $875,000. It is important to understand if further support is needed to maintain this program. In addition, the City's CDBG commitment to the Rainier Valley Community Development fund is completed in 2013 freeing up over $2 million in CDBG funding in 2014 and beyond. A portion of this funding could be used to provide ongoing support of the Home Repair program without resulting in cuts to other CDBG funded activities.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Housing, Human Services, Health, & Culture

Date Due to Council: June 3, 2013

Libraries, Utilities, and Center



15. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

27

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

SPU Rate Growth Strategic Plan

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Conlin; Godden

Staff Analyst:

Meg Moorehead



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 72-Absent

Y

-

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) develop a strategic plan covering all of its lines of business as a basis for a rate growth policy. The plan would:

* Conduct an activity-by-activity evaluation of SPU spending to identify reasonable future growth in costs and rates that incorporates Council feedback on the assumptions used in the evaluation.

* Address not just growth in the individual rates (drainage, solid waste, water and wastewater) from a perspective of covering SPU costs but also the growth in combined SPU bills paid by customers from the perspective of a customer's ability to pay.

* Use consultant input regarding potential efficiencies based on industry best practice.

* Consider options to moderate bill increases for ratepayers (such as large residential drainage ratepayers) who have experienced especially large bill increases.

* Be submitted to Council prior to submittal of the next SPU rate proposal.

SPU should periodically provide the Council with progress updates throughout 2013, including an interim progress report in June 2013.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Libraries, Utilities, and Center

Date Due to Council: December 31, 2013

16. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

33

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

SPU and SCL Bill Delinquency Reduction

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Conlin; Godden

Staff Analyst:

Meg Moorehead



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

To inform future decisions about how to reduce utility bill delinquencies by reducing overlapping billing cycles and monthly and seasonal peaks in bills, the Council requests that Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) and Seattle City Light (SCL) submit a report that:

1) Describes the relationship between due dates for SPU and SCL bills and delinquency of those bills, including any seasonal variation in that relationship.

2) Identifies ways to decouple billing cycles so that a bill for two months of SPU service is due one month and a bill for two months of City Light services is due in the next.

3) Discusses the benefits and challenges of more widespread use of budget billing -a SCL and SPU service that averages bills over the year so that the customer receives uniform monthly bills -and whether budget billing could play a larger role in avoiding bill delinquencies.

4) Provides a progress update on SCL's data analysis of delinquent bills and how subsequent outreach is working toward reduced bill delinquency and increased assistance to low-income customers.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Libraries, Utilities, and Center

Date Due to Council: March 31, 2013

Parks and Neighborhoods



17. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

41

3

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Comprehensive Report Regarding Recreational and Parks Program Service Needs of the Lake City Urban Village and North District Neighborhood Planning Area

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Clark; Godden

Staff Analyst:

Jesse Gilliam



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/09/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) provide a comprehensive report regarding recreational and Parks program service needs of the Lake City Urban Village and the North District Neighborhood Planning Area.

DPR should use a variety of resources to assess the needs of the community, including, but not limited to:

* Current demographic data for the Lake City Urban Village and North District Neighborhood Planning Area, recent changes in the data, and projected growth for the next 5 to 10 years;

* Whether the Lake City Urban Village and North District Neighborhood Planning Area meet the distribution guidelines for community centers in DPR's 2011 Development Plan;

* The goals of the North District Neighborhood Plan, which includes Lake City; and

* Information obtained by DPR from the needs assessment for teens and seniors to be served by the Lake City Community Center called for in Green Sheet 41-1-A-1.

The report should compare the needs assessment with the recreational and program services currently being provided by such agencies as the Seattle Housing Authority, community nonprofits, and community associations (e.g. Boys and Girls Club, the YMCA), and at nearby community centers operated by the City.

Based on this comparison, the report should identify and recommend ways to address any service gaps.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Parks and Neighborhoods

Date Due to Council: September 30, 2013

18. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

107

2

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Community Center Attendance and Usage Analysis by DPR

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Clark; Conlin

Staff Analyst:

Kathy Nyland; Traci Ratzliff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/09/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Department of Parks and Recreation provide a report to the Council's Parks and Neighborhoods Committee by September 9th, 2013 that would include information on usage of all community centers, and whether additional funding is needed to provide hours to some community centers that cannot be provided via reallocation of hours as part of the Geographic Management Model.

The Council also requests that DPR provide a progress report on attendance figures in early June 2013approximately one year after the last of the infrared "people counters" was installed.

In the fall of 2010, City Council adopted Statement of Legislative Intent (SLI) 101-1-A-1, also known as the Community Center Partnership and Planning Analysis. This SLI requested that the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) examine new models of operation and management for the community center system.

DPR worked closely with community leaders and their recreational partners (including the Associated Recreation Council and Advisory Councils), the City Budget Office, and the City Council. As a result of this nine-month effort, DPR announced an alternative management, staffing, and operating hours model for the City's Community Centers in the summer of 2011.

The Geographic Management of Community Centers created five teams within the city and each team had tiered service levels for the Community Centers. The service levels are Level 1 (70 public hours per week), Level 2a (45 public hours per week), and 2b (25 public hours per week).

The new management model included coordinated management, staffing, and program planning for the four or five centers clustered within each geographic team. One geographic team manager is responsible for the management of all the centers within his/her sector and programming is to complement each center within a cluster. Geographic team managers can also adjust hours and programming at individual centers to meet the demand and need of different centers within a cluster.

Because the new Geographic Management Model of Operation is based on proven demand and need, Council included $205,000 funding in the 2012 Adopted budget so DPR could purchase and install infrared "people counters" at each center. These counters have now been installed at each Community Center and data is being collected to show the number of people utilizing the center by time of day.

During deliberations of the 2013 2014 proposed budget, DPR has stated that it is premature to make modifications to the classifications and tiers of community centers. They would prefer to gather 15 to 18 months of data before revisiting and making adjustments.

Council desires to monitor this effort closely to ensure the new management model of the community centers is a success. This SLI would request DPR to provide a comprehensive report on the attendance and usage of all the community centers within the DPR system.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Parks and Neighborhoods

Date Due to Council: June 1, 2013 (Progress Report)

September 9, 2013

19. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

111

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

DPR and ARC Fundraising

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Burgess; Rasmussen

Staff Analyst:

Norm Schwab



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that DPR and ARC present a report on a combined and coordinated fundraising strategy to the Council's Parks and Neighborhoods Committee by May 1, 2013. In preparing the report, the Council requests that DPR and ARC conduct an assessment of best practices in other parks departments to inform the strategy, including an analysis of successful funding sources in other locales.

The Council also requests DPR and ARC to provide progress reports on the fundraising efforts at the end of each subsequent quarter in 2013 -June 30, September 30 and December 31.

Background:

The Council recognizes that in order to improve the success of fundraising efforts for parks and recreation programs that the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) will be contracting with the Associated Recreation Council (ARC) to raise $300,000 over the 2013-2014 biennium. DPR will provide ARC $75,000 in General Subfunds per year for the biennium to cover ARC's staffing, and after 2014 ARC's fundraising efforts will become self-sustaining. DPR believes that donors, in particular corporate donors, will be more inclined to give money to a non-profit entity than to the City directly.

Concurrently, DPR is reorganizing its own staff in the partnerships units, contracting unit, and recreation division to handle various aspects of fundraising, partnerships, and grant writing. A new manager in the recreation division will be tasked with developing partnerships and grants focused on programming and service delivery.

While these changes have the potential to increase resources to support parks programming, they also have implications for changing the face of Seattle parks. With many efforts underway simultaneously at ARC and DPR, coordination on strategy and implementation will be important. Even within DPR itself, coordination between different divisions and functions will be needed. The Council desires to monitor this effort closely to ensure its success and to provide policy guidance on issues that could change the appearance, operations, and use of Seattle parks.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Parks and Neighborhoods

Date Due to Council: First Report May 1, 2013

Progress Reports June 30, September 30 and December 31, 2013

20. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

114

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Athletic Fields fees for 2014 and 2015

Councilmembers:

Bagshaw; Burgess; Rasmussen

Staff Analyst:

Tony Kilduff



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

This Statement of Legislative Intent requests that the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) report to the Council on the annual cost to operate and maintain its athletic fields, and any changes to fees for those fields it anticipates proposing for 2014 and 2015. The Council wishes to discuss options for fee levels with the DPR and to allow public notice of any likely changes at least six months before the fees go into effect. Also, Council requests DPR to assess the feasibility of setting up an athletic field maintenance reserve, funded with fees and/or other City revenue, to assure that DPR can keep pace with replacement or rehabilitation requirements of athletic fields.

Background:

The primary users of DPR's athletic fields are groups that must plan and organize an entire season's worth of activities a year in advance. To be successful, they must budget all of their planned use of the fields and reserve them accordingly. Unfortunately, it frequently happens that DPR requests, and is granted, fee increases for the fields during budget when planning by these user groups is already complete, causing problems for the community DPR is trying to serve.

In order to strike a balance between the needs of the community being served and the needs of the department for sufficient resources to fulfill its mission, the Council needs to understand the costs underlying any request for fee increases. With this in mind, the Council requests that DPR provide timely information on the cost to operate and maintain its athletic fields and any changes to fees it anticipates, even if the proposed fees are tentative or reflect a reasonable range of possibilities.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Parks and Neighborhoods

Date Due to Council: May 1, 2013

Planning, Land Use and Sustainability



21. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

49

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

DPD Planning Division work program development and reporting

Councilmembers:

Burgess; Clark; Conlin

Staff Analyst:

Ketil Freeman



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/09/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that the Department of Planning and Development (DPD) report to the Council periodically on work program development for the Planning Division.

In the 2012 adopted budget the Council included Statement of Legislative Intent (SLI) 63-1-A-1 that directed DPD to develop a multi-year work program that could be used as a shared tool by the Council and Mayor to prioritize resources among projects in the Planning Budget Control Level (BCL). Among other things, the Planning BCL contains functions in DPD that develop policy and regulations that are incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan, the Land Use Code, and other policy and regulatory documents that govern development of the built environment. Consistent with SLI 63-1-A-1, the Planning Division Director reports quarterly on work program development and briefs the Planning Land Use and Sustainability Committee on proposed new projects.

This budget action continues the required work program reporting.

Frequency of Report:

Reports should be provided quarterly to the Council in advance of the quarterly supplemental budget and grant acceptance ordinances and never later than March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31, 2013. Reports may be provided concurrently with regularly scheduled reports by the DPD Director to the Planning Land Use and Sustainability Committee.

Contents of Report:

Each report shall contain the following:

* An up-to-date work program;

* A narrative description of any new or changed projects proposed by the Executive or Council;

* Approximate FTE assignments by project; and

* A summary table identifying by project and fund source all anticipated resources likely to flow from quarterly grant acceptance and supplemental budget ordinances or from any other sources not required to be appropriated through a supplemental budget ordinance.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Planning, Land Use and Sustainability

Date Due to Council: March 31, 2013

June 30, 2013

September 30, 2013

December 31, 2013

Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology



22. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

60

2

B

2



Budget Action Title:

SOCR Review of Civil Rights Enforcement Process

Councilmembers:

Clark; Harrell; O'Brien

Staff Analyst:

Josh Fogt; Rebecca Herzfeld; Jeremy Racca



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/09/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

The Council requests that Office of the City Auditor (OCA) review the investigation, enforcement and technical assistance functions of the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR) and report back to the Council.

The report should address the following issues:

1. Report on SOCR's allocation of staff resources dedicated to processing civil rights enforcement complaints and evaluate whether staffing levels are adequate to:

* Meet legal standards for the investigation of charges of discrimination;

* Reach settlements to resolve charges of discrimination;

* Meet goals for turnaround times for each step in the process; and

* Provide relevant information and technical assistance to businesses, including staff knowledgeable of business regulations and practices.

2. Examine enforcement models from other jurisdictions around the country, review SOCR existing practices, and present recommendations for:

* Delivering objective investigation and enforcement of civil rights laws for both complainants and respondents;

* Streamlining the processing of civil rights complaints without compromising the rights of complainants, including a review of the roles of SOCR, Seattle Human Rights Commission, the Law Department, and Hearing Examiner; and

* Providing businesses and landlords the information, resources and skills to understand civil rights laws, avoid charges of discrimination by meeting these laws, and responding effectively if a complaint is filed.

Green Sheet 60-1-A-2 proposes to add a half-time Senior Planning and Development Specialist position in SOCR to provide additional outreach and technical support to the business community upon Council review of the report generated as a result of this Statement of Legislative Intent.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology

Date Due to Council: June 30, 2013

23. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

62

1

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Police: Determining the appropriate size of the police force

Councilmembers:

Clark; Conlin; Harrell; Licata

Staff Analyst:

Peter Harris



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/07/2012

Pass 81-Absent

Y

Y

-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

In approving the budget for the Police Department, it is the Council's intent to develop a more complete basis for determining the appropriate size of the police force.

The Council recognizes that there is unlikely to be a good and complete answer to this question that is readily available. Therefore the best approach may be a phased approach, in which the City reviews the sworn staffing requirements for major police functions in light of the major outcomes desired of the police.

Accordingly the Council requests that the Police Department, Executive and Council staff jointly develop a scope for analyzing the sworn staffing requirements for major police functions. This may begin with a review of the Neighborhood Policing Plan for patrol, and then proceed sequentially to other major functions such as crime investigations and traffic enforcement.

Background:

Resolution 30930, adopted in 2006, stated the Council's desire to determine the number of officers and other Police Department resources that will reasonably enhance public safety, and asked the Mayor to recommend the appropriate number of police officers for 2008 through 2012. In response, the Department and the Mayor proposed the Neighborhood Policing Plan, which the Council endorsed in 2007.

The Neighborhood Policing Plan focused on the number of officers assigned to patrol. It called for 605 officers to be assigned to 911 response in the five precincts, based on an analysis of the number of officers that would be required to meet response time goals and also have enough time when not responding to calls to proactively address crime problems in their beats. Subsequent analysis suggested that alternative shift structures could reduce this minimum to approximately 580 officers. This plan is an example of a workload-based assessment of patrol needs, recently recommended by the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services as the preferred method for determining the number of patrol officers.

Patrol, however, comprises only about half of the sworn force. Other major Police Department functions include crime investigations, homeland security, gang interdiction, special weapons and tactical response, and traffic enforcement. In addition there are a variety of support functions staffed at least in part by officers. In total, the Department's list of functional priorities includes 17 direct sworn mission functions, 10 sworn and civilian mission support functions, and seven sworn and civilian supplemental services. As yet there is no comprehensive workload-based or benchmarked assessment of the appropriate level of sworn staffing in these functions.

Further, there have been many innovations in policing in the last few decades, and all signs are that the pace of innovation will continue. Almost ten years ago a committee of the National Research Council concluded that the standard policing model, consisting largely of random patrol, fast responses to 911 calls and follow-up investigations, has little effect on crime. A wide variety of alternative and sometimes overlapping strategies and tactics have been developed, variously labeled problem-oriented policing, COMPSTAT, place-based or hot spot policing, focused deterrence, and the like. A growing body of research suggests that many of these techniques can have powerful effects on crime, but results have varied across different implementations of similar techniques, and research and refinements continue.

In the meantime, expectations are rising. Due in part to significant reductions in crime apparently resulting at least in part from improvements in policing, citizens in large cities are no longer accepting high crime rates as a given.

All these suggest that a reconsideration of the appropriate size of the Seattle police force is in order. The Council sought to do part of this in 2012, with a Statement of Legislative Intent calling for an update to the Neighborhood Policing Plan. By agreement of the Council and Executive midyear, this work was postponed due to continued uncertainty about the City's budget situation and consequent uncertainty about the number of officers the Department would be able to assign to patrol.

Response: First written scoping report to Public Safety, Civil Rights & Technology Committee on or before March 29, 2013

Responsible Council Committee(s): Public Safety, Civil Rights and Technology

Date Due to Council: March 29, 2013

Transportation Committee



24. 2013 2014 Seattle Statement of Legislative Intent City Council

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

76

3

A

1



Budget Action Title:

Transit Master Plan Implementation

Councilmembers:

Licata; O'Brien; Rasmussen

Staff Analyst:

Bill Laborde



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/19/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

This Statement of Legislative Intent reiterates the Council's support for the Seattle Transit Master Plan (TMP) and its priorities, with the intention that the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) implement near-term improvements to the Priority Bus Corridors (PBC), utilizing existing rights-of-way to provide better transit service and reliability for today's passengers. It is also the Council's intent that SDOT continue planning for the High Capacity Transit (HCT) corridors identified in the TMP, including the Eastlake corridor, in a timely manner so that Seattle can meet longer-term growth in transit demand. Following the City Budget Office 1 st Quarter update of revenue projections and upon review of the 1 st Quarter Supplemental Budget, Council will examine prospects to move up the Eastlake HCT corridor planning to begin in 2013.

Because of the lower capital costs and shorter timeline for planning and construction of bus improvements, the City Council requests SDOT to work with King County Metro to pursue federal and state grant opportunities to accelerate development of Madison HCT, and to improve and expand the City's electric trolley bus (ETB) network as identified in the TMP. In particular, Council requests the Department to look for opportunities to fill-in the missing trolley wire links on the 23 rd Ave corridor served by Metro Transit's historic Route 48 and to develop a plan to provide ETB service on Yesler between downtown and First Hill.

To demonstrate progress in delivering on these TMP goals, the Council requests a written TMP implementation work plan for 2013 by the end of the 1 st quarter, along with a written report on measures planned or taken to pursue state and federal grant funds for the 23 rd Ave and Madison corridors by the end of the 2 nd quarter 2013.

Consistent with the TMP, Council expects SDOT to conduct a full alternatives analysis for each of the HCT corridors before allocating significant additional funds for preliminary engineering or construction. For each corridor, the alternatives analysis will assess existing transit capacity, potential ridership gains, capital and operating costs, travel time estimates and other relevant costs and benefits associated with each alternative transit enhancement identified in the TMP -enhanced bus service, bus rapid transit and rail.

Background:

On April 16, 2012, by Resolution 31367 , the City Council adopted the TMP with the Mayor's concurrence. The TMP recommends six priority strategies for improving transit in Seattle: (1) Continue Implementation of Priority Bus Corridors; (2) Develop Center City Transit to Support Downtown Growth and Vitality; (3) Plan, Fund and Build High Capacity Transit Projects; (4) Enhance Walk-Bike-Ride Access where Needs are Greatest; (5) Improve Transit Information and System Usability; and (6) Pursue Funding to Enhance Transit Service and Facilities.

Through previous actions, and by adoption of the 2013-2014 budget, the City will be advancing improvements on 8 of the 12 PBC's identified in the TMP, including the City's three RapidRide corridors, along with Delridge, 23 rd Ave and others. These projects are consistent with the intent of Council to provide near-term improvements to today's bus network while initiating long term planning for the HCT corridors.

Through actions already taken by Council and Mayor, the City is advancing design and environmental analysis of the Broadway Extension of the First Hill Streetcar; a corridor study for Center City HCT (Downtown Connector); and a joint study with Sound Transit of transit improvements between Ballard and Downtown. Council is providing funding in the 2013-2014 biennial budget to begin advancing the TMP's remaining two HCT corridor studies: (1) Central Area-First Hill-Downtown via Madison in 2013; and (2) Roosevelt-University District-South Lake Union via Eastlake beginning in 2014.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Transportation

Date Due to Council: March 31, 2013

25. 2013 2014 Seattle City Council Statement of Legislative Intent

Approved

Tab

Action

Option

Version

77

2

A

1



Budget Committee Vote:

Date

Result

SB

BH

TR

RC

TB

NL

JG

SC

MO

11/09/2012

Pass 9-

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y



Statement of Legislative Intent:

In adding funding to the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) to accelerate implementation of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plans and in prioritizing funding in SDOT's proposed 20132014 budget through Green Sheet 77-1-A-1 for the bicycle and pedestrian capital projects identified below, the City Council intends that these projects receive top priority for implementation of the Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plans. Also, it is the Council's intent that SDOT complete these projects with design innovation and excellence, setting examples for other bicycle and pedestrian projects throughout the City. Projects to receive priority implementation in the 2013-2014 biennium are:

1. Ballard neighborhood greenway

2. Delridge neighborhood greenway

3. Downtown cycle track network

4. West Seattle lower bridge trail access

The Council's intent is that:

1. SDOT design and construct segments of the Ballard and Delridge neighborhood greenways in 2013 (2.1 miles in Ballard and 1.25 miles in Delridge) and complete at least a 10% concept design for the remaining portions of each greenway in 2013.

2. SDOT complete at least a 30% design, including identifying specific routes and improvements types and cost estimates for an approximate 2 miles of the Downtown cycle track network. This work will begin after the Bicycle Master Plan update is adopted and cycle track concept development (10% design) work included in the proposed budget is completed.

3. SDOT complete final design of an initial .25 mile Downtown cycle track so that construction can start by the end of 2014.

4. SDOT complete at least a 10% concept design with cost estimates for intersection and access improvements to the West Seattle lower bridge multimodal trail in 2013.

It is also the Council's intent that SDOT prioritize advancing design work on the following additional neighborhood greenways in the 2013-2014 biennium with base budget resources: Rainier Valley, Central District, Lake City, and University District.

It is the Council's intent that a total of $3.35M in 2013 and $250K in 2014 be prioritized for the above listed projects from the following Capital Improvement Program (CIP) projects to implement Green Sheet 77-1-A-1: Bicycle Master Plan Implementation (TC366760), Pedestrian Master Plan Implementation (TC367150), and Sidewalk Safety Repairs (TC365120). The CIP projects are budgeted in SDOT's Mobility-Capital and Major Maintenance and Replacement capital Budget Control Levels (BCLs) with the provisos established in Green Sheet 77-1-A-1, so these funds will automatically carry forward as needed.

In setting these priorities, Council is mindful of SDOT's goal to balance funding for bicycle and pedestrian projects each year using the updated Bicycle Master Plan and Pedestrian Master Plan criteria along with other factors such as coordination with other projects, partnering opportunities, geographic distribution, and the Race and Social Justice Initiative.

In addition, Council requests that SDOT report on progress in design and/or construction of these projects to the Council's Transportation Committee by March 29 th and September 27 th , 2013.

Responsible Council Committee(s): Transportation

Date Due to Council: First report March 29, 2013

Second report September 27, 2013

Ben Noble/ss LEG 2013 SLI Resolution Attachment A: 2013 Statements of Legislative Intent by Council Committee February 1, 2013 Version #1

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